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Chapin Head of School Announces Retirement  

Chapin Head of School Announces Retirement  

5/15/19—Dr. Patricia Hayot, Head of School at The Chapin School and former President of the NCGS Board of Trustees, recently announced she will retire after the 2019-2020 school year. Dr. Hayot has served in the role for 17 years and has led countless initiatives that have transformed the school in ways that will be felt far into the future.

Her achievements include, implementing a full K-12 World Languages program; enhancing STEAM offerings; introducing a comprehensive and innovative six-day schedule; developing the Focus Forward strategic plan, which ensures rigorous academics and profound character development for students; and overseeing the school’s current building project.

Chapin’s Board Chair LeeAnn Black remarked that Dr. Hayot “approached each of these initiatives and projects as she approaches everything she does—with tremendous compassion, extraordinary intellect, resolute determination, unwavering grace, endless energy and infectious humor.”

Dr. Hayot shared her “great affection and deep thanks” to the Chapin community and offered the following advice to students: “Chapin provides the tools you need to tell your own story, be your own person, build your own company, love your own job, create and nurture your own families, support and extend your own communities and work on behalf of your own country and your own planet, to give you, in short, the optimism of will and the strength of mind to make for yourselves a life that matters to you and to those around you. If, as we expect, this happens for you, I urge you to work to extend your luck, your dedication, your privilege and your happiness to all.”


Students from Branksome Hall Asia Perform at Marymount & Nightingale-Bamford

Students from Branksome Hall Asia Perform at Marymount & Nightingale-Bamford

5/1/19—Students at Marymount School of New York and The Nightingale-Bamford School recently welcomed high school students from fellow National Coalition of Girls’ Schools member Branksome Hall Asia, which is located on Jeju Island, South Korea. The visiting students performed “RISE—The Story of a Woman,” an original musical written for them that was inspired by Kim Mandeok, who lived on Jeju Island from 1739–1812, and is recognized as Korea’s first female entrepreneur. The musical’s major feminist themes are intended to inspire young women of the necessity of collaboration and to remind us that until all women are free, “none of us are free.”

The project to develop RISE began in 2017 when La Mór, the Head of Arts at Branksome Hall Asia, was frustrated by the lack of empowering material for a large female cast. The writer, Jessica Mór, is an artist from the UK who found in Kim Mandeok a figure who encapsulated the culture, community, history, and mythology of the “strong” women of Jeju island. And in whose life story she feels holds hope and inspiration for an international audience seeking solutions to contemporary struggles of equality and emancipation, both personal and political.


Head of School at St. Catherine’s School Announces Retirement

Head of School at St. Catherine’s School Announces Retirement

4/30/19—Dr. Terrie Hale Scheckelhoff, who has served as Head of School at St. Catherine’s School since 2012 and as a member of the NCGS Board of Trustees since 2014, recently announced she will retire at the end of the 2019–2020 school year.

“I am grateful that my time at [St. Catherine’s School] is the capstone of my life’s work,” Scheckelhoff said. “Most of all, the girls have filled my heart and given a lift to my step each day. They make me smile, and they model what greatness can look like in our world. I know that they are destined to live with purpose and integrity.”

Under Scheckelhoff’s leadership, St. Catherine’s has flourished locally and nationally, achieving substantial growth, progress, and financial strength. Notable achievements include introducing academic programs such as Girls Innovate Signature Program, increased STEM offerings, Lower School Clubhouse enrichment program, a 4-year/3-counselor College Counseling Model, and a school-wide health and wellness program; growing student enrollment to capacity and increasing students of color enrollment; developing the Center for Early Childhood Education; and renovating and/or building new facilities, including two libraries, a media lab, an innovation lab, maker spaces, Center for Early Childhood Education, and Phase 1 of the southern third of the campus.

“In addition to her intelligence, thought leadership, and insatiable energy, Terrie is an outstanding role model for girls and young women,” said Herbert A. Claiborne III, Chair of St. Catherine’s Board of Governors. “She has touched the hearts of many—from the youngest child in Early Learners to the oldest alumna—with her warmth, positivity, enthusiasm, and collaborative nature. Needless to say, we will miss her dearly.”


Can Single Sex Schools Shrink the Achievement Gap?

Can Single Sex Schools Shrink the Achievement Gap?

4/24/19—Janelle Bradshaw, Superintendent of Public Prep Academies, was recently interviewed about the benefits of single-gender schools.

The following is an excerpt from the New York School Talk interview:

“In our single-sex model, we place a large emphasis on character development and our core values of merit, responsibility, scholarship and sisterhood. Our girls are empowered to speak up and speak out with determination and confidence. They become empathetic leaders with bold intellect. The single-sex setting has also been linked to developing resilience and perseverance in young students.

On the academic front, the consequences of single-sex education appear to be significantly favorable for low-income and minority students. Disadvantaged students in single-sex schools, compared to their counterparts in coeducational schools, demonstrate higher achievement outcomes on standardized tests in mathematics, reading, science, and civics.”

Read the full interview.


All-Female Marching Band to be Featured in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

All-Female Marching Band to be Featured in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

4/19/19—Students from the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders were selected to perform in the 2020 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The school’s marching band, the Marching Stars, will join the parade to the call of “Let’s Have a Parade,” the iconic phrase that has signaled the beginning of every Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade since 1924.

“To have the Ann Richards Marching Stars, the only all-female marching band in the country, share the stage with other incredible band programs at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is a dream come true,” said Stephen Howard, the director of bands at Ann Richards School. “This performance will not only have an impact on our band program, but also will showcase the leadership and success of the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders.”

Wesley Whatley, creative producer for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, added, “The Macy’s Parade has a long history of hosting outstanding marching bands from the state of Texas but we’ve never seen a band quite as unique and special as the Marching Stars. We are proud to welcome the talented women of the Ann Richards Marching Stars for their debut performance in the 2020 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade!”


Student Film Selected for International Ocean Film Festival

Student Film Selected for International Ocean Film Festival

4/18/19—Our Ocean, a film created by a team of Hamlin School 5thgraders, was recently shown at the International Ocean Film Festival (IOFF). The student film explores the importance of the ocean and delves into the crucial environmental threats that it currently faces. Our Ocean blends beauty and splendor, with a call to action, echoing Hamlin’s mission to “meet the challenges of our time.”

The IOFF, now in its 16thyear, is an acclaimed festival of independent films from around the world on topics ranging from ocean adventure, science, and marine life to sports and coastal cultures. The festival features “films that not only entertain audiences but also educate and inspire people to participate in environmental efforts in and around the ocean, as well as promote better ocean stewardship.”


Stoneleigh-Burham School Hosts Forum with Candace Hope

Stoneleigh-Burham School Hosts Forum with Candace Hope

4/15/19—Stoneleigh-Burnham School recently welcomed Candace Hope to campus as part of the school’s annual Miriam Emerson Peters Speaker Series in Global Awareness. Hope, a documentary photographer based in Western Massachusetts, spent a month in Nairobi, Kenya in 2013, documenting the work of the Kibera School for Girls (KSG) and the non-profit organization Shining Hope for Communities (SHOFCO).

KSG is a tuition-free school in the largest urban slum in Africa that is working to educate and empower girls to be leaders in their community. SHOFCO is a grassroots movement that catalyzes large-scale transformation in urban slums by providing critical services for all, community advocacy platforms, and education and leadership development for women and girls.

At the event, SBS facilitated a salon-style forum in which Hope and current SBS student Idah Mwongeli ’22, a graduate of KSG, discussed SHOFCO and presented Hope’s photography.


Sacred Heart Academy Students to Present at National Science Convention

Sacred Heart Academy Students to Present at National Science Convention

4/10/19—Students from Sacred Heart Academy received invitations to present their psychological research projects at the Association of Psychological Science (APS) National Convention in Washington, D.C. in May.

Scholars from all over the world will gather to share cutting-edge insights. The Sacred Heart Academy students, consisting of nine seniors and three juniors, will present and discuss their original research alongside professional researchers. Sacred Heart Academy’s Science Research Director Stephen Sullivan encouraged the students to submit their respective projects to the convention, suggesting Social Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, and Educational Psychology as relevant subfields.

“Sacred Heart Academy, especially the science research program, has offered so many great opportunities from day one,” said Madison E. ’20. “This opportunity in particular will prepare me for a future in the STEM field from independent research as an undergraduate student to Master’s and doctoral theses. I am very excited to represent Sacred Heart Academy on a national stage.”

Colleen O. ’19 added, “We all feel extremely humbled to be invited to present our research alongside undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdocs…we are also honored to have the chance to speak to and learn from experts in the field.”

A complete listing of student projects can be viewed here.


Miss Hall’s School Receives Historic $5 Million Gift

Miss Hall’s School Receives Historic $5 Million Gift

4/1/19—Miss Hall’s School (MHS) recently received its largest gift to date: $5 million from Theresa S. Thompson, an alumna from the Class of 1964.

The gift is dedicated to supporting innovative teaching by building on a tradition of academic excellence that dates to the school’s founding in 1898. Ms. Thompson’s historic contribution will attract and retain MHS faculty who create and lead rigorous courses that are rich in interdisciplinary, project-based, and collaborative learning.

Ms. Thompson, who has long been a supporter of Miss Hall’s, said, “I have been so moved by the teachers, coaches, and role models who work with students each day that I wanted to make a major contribution to MHS…I am proud to be a Miss Hall’s alumna, and I believe one of the ways we can show appreciation for what the school has meant in our lives is to support its important work in meaningful, substantive ways that make a difference in the lives of future women leaders.”


NCGS Op-Ed Featured in The Baltimore Sun

NCGS Op-Ed Featured in The Baltimore Sun

3/26/19—[Excerpt from The Baltimore Sun op-ed by NCGS Executive Director Megan Murphy]

“You don’t need to look much further than recent headlines to see that women today are making a historic impact. Before the 116th U.S. Congress was sworn in, never had more than 84 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives been filled by women. Now that number is over 100.

The number is worth celebrating, but it’s also worth considering the broader context as we recognize Women’s History Month. Despite those gains, women still make up just 25 percent of the U.S. Senate and 23 percent of the House of Representatives. It was just 100 years ago — which may feel like a long time, but it really isn’t — that some women were on the front lines fighting for their right to vote in this country. And it wasn’t until even later, in the 1960s, that women of color were able to freely exercise that right.

Elsewhere, we continue to see women underrepresented in leadership roles. Women make up only 5 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs. And among the largest non-profit charities in the world, a slim 18 percent are led by women. Yet these recent gains remain vital. As girls and women across the globe face new obstacles and challenges, the existence of fearless, visible role models is invaluable. For the next generation of women leaders, girls and young women must ‘see it to be it.'”

Read the full story as it appeared in The Baltimore Sun.


BELA Charter is Changing the Approach to High School

BELA Charter is Changing the Approach to High School

3/19/19—[Excerpt from Forbes article] “The Brooklyn Emerging Leaders Academy Charter High School, aptly known as BELA, co-founded by Nicia Fullwood and Shannon Riley, has chosen an untraditional approach to create the next generation of leaders at their all-girl charter high school in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York.

BELA opened its doors August 2017, accepting its first cohort of 60 freshman girls. With a current enrollment of 120 girls, Fullwood and Riley are hoping to have their first graduating class in June 2021. But, this isn’t just about pumping students out to 4-year universities, BELA wants to set these young women up to live purpose-driven lives. In creating BELA’s curriculum, the duo focused on teaching their students about service, scholarship, strength, and most importantly sisterhood.

The staff at BELA take their role in these students’ futures seriously and have built a curriculum to ensure they see their students succeed.”

Read the full story as it appeared in Forbes.


Sacred Hearts Academy Appoints New Head of School

Sacred Hearts Academy Appoints New Head of School

3/18/19—Sacred Hearts Academy recently appointed Dr. Scott Schroeder to be the next Head of School, effective July 1, 2019.

Dr. Schroeder joined the Academy’s Board of Directors in July 2013 and was named Chair in July 2017. He currently serves as Dean of the School of Business and Communication and Professor of Management at Chaminade University of Honolulu, and he has spent his career in various university faculty and leadership positions.

Dr. Schroeder shared, “Today’s young women have unprecedented opportunities and face emerging challenges as well. The Academy’s core values and approach to education distinctively prepare students for personal and professional success, and contribution to our communities throughout their lives. I am tremendously honored to be appointed Head of School and eager to work with Academy faculty, staff, parents, and alumnae to ensure the school provides its students the best that a Sacred Hearts, Catholic education offers: spiritual enrichment, adventurous learning, and a joyful atmosphere.”